Golden Triangle tour runs in a triangle of British, Rajputana and Mughal culture all at once. You will experience uniqueness of British architecture in Delhi, the colorful Rajputana in Jaipur and one of 8 wonders of world, the Taj Mahal, which represents Mughal culture in mesmerizing way. This tour extends it to visit Mathura and Brindavan.

Total Duration: 5 Nights 6 Days
Day 1:Arrival at Jaipur and full day sightseeing

On the day 1, our representative will receive you at Jaipur. You will then check-in in the hotel and later proceed for full day Jaipur local sightseeing. Overnight stay will be at Jaipur.

Places to visit:

Amber Fort: Now a UNESCO World Heritage Site, it was the bastion of the Kachwahas of Amber, until the capital was moved to the plains, to what is today Jaipur. The palace, located in craggy hills, is a beautiful melange of Hindu and Mughal styles.

City Palace: Located deep within the walled city, the City Palace Complex was conceived and built by Maharaja Sawai Jai Singh II, the founder of Jaipur. A beautiful fusion of Mughal and Rajput architecture, the palace is still home to the last ruling royal family which lives in a private section of the palace.

Jantar Mantar: Now a UNESCO World Heritage Site, Jantar Mantar in Jaipur is considered to be the largest of the five astronomical observatories built by Maharaja Sawai Jai Singh II, the founder of Jaipur. It contains sixteen geometric devices, designed to measure time, track celestial bodies and observe the orbits of the planets around the sun. It also houses the Interpretation Centre that helps the tourists to understand about the working principles & chronolgy of the observatory.

Hawa Mahal: Hawa Mahal, literally the Palace of Winds, was built in 1799 by the poet king Sawai Pratap Singh as a summer retreat for him and his family. It also served as a place where the ladies of the royal household could observe everyday life without being seen themselves. This unique five-storey structure is a blend of Hindu and Islamic architecture, and the exterior, with its small latticed windows (called jharokhas), resembles the crown of Lord Krishna.

Nahargarh Fort: Nahargarh Fort sits proudly on a ridge of the Aravalli Hills, creating an impressive northern backdrop to the city of Jaipur. It was constructed during the reign of Jai Singh in 1734, and was later expanded in 1868. Nahargarh, which means abode of tigers, was a formidable barrier, defending Jaipur against attacking enemies. The fort looks brilliant when floodlit at night. Overlooking the city, it presents a glittering view of the city lights.

Day 2: Jaipur full day sightseeing

After breakfast, we will proceed for full day Jaipur sightseeing. Overnight stay at Jaipur.

Places to visit:

Birla Mandir: The Lakshmi-Narayan Temple, or the Birla Temple, as it is more popularly known as, is located at the base of Moti Dungari. Built on an elevated platform, this comparatively modern temple is built entirely of white marble and dominates the skyline of south Jaipur. The temple was commissioned and built by renowned Indian industrialists, the Birlas, in 1988. The temple is dedicated to Lord Vishnu, also called Narayan, and his companion, Lakshmi, the Goddess of wealth and good fortune. The temple is a work of art and has a marvellous display of exquisite carvings and sculptures covering many mythological themes.

Jal Mahal: One of the most wonderful sights in Jaipur is the beautiful Jal Mahal or Lake Palace. The light, sand coloured stone walls and the deep blue of the water make for a wonderful contrast. The palace appears to float in the centre of Man Sagar Lake, where its magnificent exteriors can be enjoyed by tourists.

Gaitore ki chhatriya: Just off the Jaipur-Amber road is Gaitore, where the former Maharajas of Jaipur are entombed. The chhatris (cenotaphs), made of white marble display the distinctive Rajput style of architecture. The open pavilions with ornate domes are supported by delicately sculpted pillars. The crematorium is located in the middle of yellow sandstone hills. The décor and extravagance of a particular chattri is meant to reflect the stature and prowess of the ruler it contains. The most graceful and beautiful chattri at Gaitor is that of Maharaja Jai Singh with 20 carved pillars. Tourists are especially drawn towards it because of its intricate carvings.

Sisodia Rani Garden: Sisodia Rani Palace and Garden is located 8 kilometres from Jaipur on the Agra road. Laid out in Mughal style, it is painted with the legends of Radha and Krishna. The garden is multi-tiered and has fountains, water courses and painted pavilions. Maharaja Sawai Jai Singh II built it for his Sisodia queen.

Galtaji / Monkey Temple: Galtaji is an ancient pilgrimage centre in Jaipur. Set amidst low hills and packed with locals and tourists alike, the attractive spot has temples, pavilions and holy kunds (natural springs and water tanks). Visitors to Galtaji will come across the complex of Ramgopalji temple, locally called the Monkey temple (Galwar Bagh). It gets this moniker because of a large group of resident monkeys. The green landscape and chattering monkeys add to the delight of the area. On top of the hill is a small temple dedicated to the sun god, called the Surya Mandir. Constructed by Diwan Kriparam, the temple can be seen from anywhere in the city.

Jawahar Circle: Honored as the largest circular park in Asia, Jawahar Circle is encompassed by a rose garden and offers a number of concentric jogging tracks, benches, and lush greenery.While the beautifully landscaped plantations and green areas of the park are enough to leave a visitor awed, the main attraction of the park has definitely got to be the Musical Fountain. The fountain creates spectacular shows with over 270 types of effects and over 300 colorful lights.

Albert Hall: The building gets its name from The Victoria and Albert Museum in London, the inspiration for its design. The exquisitely built Albert Hall is housed in the centre of Ram Niwas Garden. Sir Swinton Jacob (who is also the mastermind behind many other palaces in Rajasthan) conceptualised and designed it using styles from the Indo-Sarcenic architecture and the Prince of Wales laid the foundation stone of the building in 1876. The museum displays a wide range of metal objects, wood crafts, carpets, stone and metal sculptures, arms and weapons, natural stones and ivory goods. It also houses a large collection of miniatures from Bundi, Kota, Kishangarh, Udaipur and Jaipur schools of art.

Day 3: Travel to Agra visiting Abhaneri, Bharatpur and Fatehpur Sikri en-route

On the day 3, after breakfast, we will start our journey to Agra. We will visit Abhaneri, Bharatpur Bird Sanctuary and Fatehpur Sikri. Overnight stay will be at Agra.

Places to visit:

Chand Baori: The Chand Baori is a stepwell built over a thousand years ago in the Abhaneri village of Rajasthan. It is one of the largest stepwells in the world and also one of the most beautiful ones. Located in the eastern part of the province of Rajasthan, it was built by King Chanda somewhere in the 9th century.

Bharatpur Bird Sanctuary: Every year, thousands of migratory waterfowl birds such as green sandpiper and cranes visit the park during winter. It was created in mid 18th century as a small reservoir located 5 kilometres to the southeast of Bharatpur. The construction of the Ajan Bund (dam) and the subsequent flooding of this natural depression led to one of the world’s most fascinating and spectacular bird reserves. The Keoladeo Ghana National Park is considered to be one of the richest bird areas in the world today.

Fatehpur Sikri: Fatehpur Sikri is a small city in northern India, just west of Agra, founded by a 16th-century Mughal emperor. Red sandstone buildings cluster at its center. Buland Darwaza gate is the entrance to Jama Masjid mosque. Nearby is the marble Tomb of Salim Chishti. Diwan-E-Khas hall has a carved central pillar. Jodha Bais Palace is a mix of Hindu and Mughal styles, next to the 5-story Panch Mahal that overlooks the site.

Day 4: Agra full day sightseeing

You will start your day by early morning visit to Taj Mahal, followed by local sightseeing in Agra. Overnight stay will be at Agra.

Places to visit:

Taj Mahal: An immense mausoleum of white marble, built in Agra between 1631 and 1648 by order of the Mughal emperor Shah Jahan in memory of his favourite wife, the Taj Mahal is the jewel of Muslim art in India and one of the universally admired masterpieces of the world's heritage.

Agra Fort: Near the gardens of the Taj Mahal stands the important 16th-century Mughal monument known as the Red Fort of Agra. This powerful fortress of red sandstone encompasses, within its 2.5-km-long enclosure walls, the imperial city of the Mughal rulers. It comprises many fairy-tale palaces, such as the Jahangir Palace and the Khas Mahal, built by Shah Jahan; audience halls, such as the Diwan-i-Khas; and two very beautiful mosques.

Tomb of I'timād-ud-Daulah: Tomb of I'timād-ud-Daulah is a Mughal mausoleum in the city of Agra in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh. Often described as a "jewel box", sometimes called the "Bacha Taj", the tomb of I'timād-ud-Daulah is often regarded as a draft of the Taj Mahal.

Mehtab Bagh: Mehtab Bagh is a charbagh complex in Agra, North India. It lies north of the Taj Mahal complex and the Agra Fort on the opposite side of the Yamuna River, in the flood plains. The garden complex, square in shape, measures about 300 by 300 metres and is perfectly aligned with the Taj Mahal on the opposite bank.

Day 5: Travel to Delhi visting Mathura and Vrindavan en-route

On day 5, we will start for Delhi and visit Mathura and Vrindavan en-route. Overnight stay will be at Delhi.

Places to visit:

Mathura: Famed Hindu temple believed to be the location where Lord Shri Krishna first manifested.

Prem Mandir Vrindavan: Imbued with elegance and grandeur, the Prem Mandir is a massive temple that was shaped by Jagadguru Shri Kripaluji Maharaj in the year 2001. Known as "Temple of God's love", this grand religious place is dedicated to Radha Krishna as well as Sita Ram. Located in Vrindavan, the holy city in the district of Mathura in Uttar Pradesh, the temple is enveloped with piousness and serenity.

Day 6: Delhi local sightseeing and departure

On the last day of the tour, there will be local sightseeing of the Capital city and our representative will see you off at Delhi.

Places to visit:

Humayun Tomb: This magnificent garden tomb is the first substantial example of Mughal architecture in India. It was built in 1565 A.D. nine years after the death of Humayun, by his senior widow Bega Begam. Inside the walled enclosure the most notable features are the garden squares (chaharbagh) with pathways water channels, centrally located well proportional mausoleum topped by double dome.

Red Fort: The Red sandstone walls of the massive Red Fort (Lal Qila) rise 33-m above the clamour of Old Delhi as a reminder of the magnificent power and pomp of the Mughal emperors. The walls, built in 1638, were designed to keep out invaders, now they mainly keep out the noise and confusion of the city. The main gate, Lahore Gate, is one of the emotional and symbolic focal points of the modern Indian nation.

Chandni Chowk: In the heart of Old Delhi, Chandni Chowk is a busy shopping area with markets full of spices, dried fruit, silver jewelry and vivid saris, while the narrow side streets are crowded with tiny shops selling essential oils, stationery and traditional Indian sweets.

Qutab Minar: Qutab Minar is a soaring, 73 m-high tower of victory, built in 1193 by Qutab-ud-din Aibak immediately after the defeat of Delhi's last Hindu kingdom. The tower has five distinct storeys, each marked by a projecting balcony and tapers from a 15 m diameter at the base to just 2.5 m at the top.

India Gate: At the centre of New Delhi stands the 42 m high India Gate, an "Arc-de-Triomphe" like archway in the middle of a crossroad. Almost similar to its French counterpart, it commemorates the 70,000 Indian soldiers who lost their lives fighting for the British Army during the World War I. The memorial bears the names of more than 13,516 British and Indian soldiers killed in the Northwestern Frontier in the Afghan war of 1919

National War Memorial: The National War Memorial has spread over 40 acres in the India Gate complex behind the canopy, commemorating the sacrifices made by Indian soldiers.

Sansad Marg: Sansad Marg is a street located in New Delhi, India. The street gets its name from the Parliament House. The Parliament House, designed by Sir Herbert Baker, is located at the one end of Sansad Marg, which runs perpendicular to the Rajpath in Lutyens' Delhi and ends at Connaught Place Circle.